Avoiding Common Defects with CD Stud Welding

Stud welding is an operation that many industries utilize because of its diverse benefits to a wide range of production processes. While drawn arc stud welding is key for heavy-duty studs, load-bearing composite building, and other large-scale construction, CD stud welding has an equal frequency of use in different types of construction.

 

If you’re using CD stud welding in your production process, you will gain the benefits of rapid, economical, low-energy welding that provides a clean weld with no reverse-side marking. With the help of Northland Fastening Systems technical support and our selection of all the tools, studs, pins, and accessories you might need for CD stud welding, you can get your job done with ease and quality.

 

CD stud welding is a form of resistance welding, unlike drawn arc welding. Arc welding is a fusion welding process that often requires a filler material and frequently leaves a slag from the flux used that has to be cleaned to finish the product. CD stud welding doesn’t require a filler material and it leaves a clean weld that won’t need finishing after the weld is done.

 

When done correctly, CD stud welding is a fast and easy process that leaves a pristine, strong weld. However, there are some defects that can occur when CD stud welding is not performed accurately or with the right materials:

 

  • Spread of molten metal from the weld site is a common issue when weld pressure is too low, the current is too high, or the weld is timed incorrectly. Molten metal expulsion can also be evidence of surface contamination.
  • Spattering of metal is another sign of too high a current. It creates excess heat that can cause explosive spray and loss of metal at the weld site, weakening the weld overall.
  • Cracked weld connections are a clear alert to a weak weld. These cracks often occur due to lack of pressure during the weld leading to an incomplete or porous connection. Inadequate pressure during the weld leads to a low tensile strength at the connection point.
  • Indentations at the weld site are another result of incorrect pressure and/or current. With too much pressure, the current decreases and a poor weld connection is formed because of the low pressure. Welding studs indented into surface material even slightly are a sign of too high of pressure and too low of current/temperature.
  • Misshapen weld spots are also a common defect with incorrectly performed CD stud welding. A strong, accurate weld should have a perfectly circular weld mark. Bloated, smushed, or otherwise misshapen weld spots are a result of contamination or misaligned electrodes in the welding tool.

 

These defects can be easily avoided when you choose to work with NFS products and take advantage of our technicians’ expertise whenever questions arise. To learn more about our CD stud welding products and other stud welding supplies, contact NFS at (651) 730-7770 today. Request a quote online to get started on your stud welding project now.

 

Glossary of Terms for Stud Welding

For any builders, fabricators, or manufacturers who are just beginning to use stud welding operations as a tool in their work, there is a lot to learn. While stud welding appears to be a relatively simple, straightforward operation, there are many complexities about the varying types of processes. At Northland Fastening Systems, we offer a comprehensive supply of stud welding tools, studs, and accessories in addition to our expert technical support services. If you are a beginner or even an experienced stud welder, our team of skilled service technicians can provide the support and tools that you need to get the job done.

 

If you are just beginning to work with stud welding tools and processes, it’s important to understand the basic terms used to describe aspects of the operation. Some of the most important, widely used terms in the stud welding industry include:

 

  1. Stud: Any fastener used in the stud welding process. This includes pins, shear connectors, and bar anchors as well as standard studs. Studs can be made from steel, aluminum, brass, copper, or related alloys.
  2. Gun: The hand-operated tool used by the technician performing the weld. Studs are inserted in the tip of the gun and applied to the surface that it will be welded to.
  3. Controller: The electrical unit controlling the supply of voltage to the welding gun or welding tip. The controller used depends on the type of welding process, the stud dimensions, and the material to be welded to.
  4. Parent material: The surface material that the stud will be welded to. This is also called the “workpiece.” If done correctly, the bond between the stud and the parent material will be much stronger than the stud or parent material alone.
  5. Capacitor discharge (CD): A type of stud welding process that uses electrical discharge heat to connect the stud to the parent material. CD stud welding is fast, cost-effective, and clean.
  6. Drawn arc: Another common type of stud welding. The process uses an arcing current to heat the stud inside a ceramic ferrule while it is held against the parent material. This process is suited for welding heavy-duty studs with larger diameters.
  7. Ceramic ferrule: A ceramic containment piece for the stud used in a drawn arc process. It serves to regulate the weld temperature and prevent the molten metal from moving outside a desired range.
  8. Chuck: A component that holds a stud in the tip of the welding gun during the CD stud welding process.
  9. Flux: An aluminum coating on the tip of a drawn arc welding stud. It improves the ignition and de-oxidizes the pooling of the weld point.

 

There are many other terms used for different components of various welding processes, but this list covers the basic vocabulary used in most stud welding operations. To learn more about stud welding and the tools or terms used, contact Northland Fastening Systems at (651) 730-7770 or request a quote online today.

 

 

 

 

 

Application of Shear Connectors in Thru-Deck Stud Welding

Stud welding is a versatile process with many industrial applications. While stud welding is often primarily used in exterior or visible interior installations, it is also a key operation for large-scale construction. Shear connectors and other anchor bar systems provide necessary strengthening of a structure and critical support against stresses. If you are fabricating a system with metal decking or other weld-thru metal structures, Northland Fastening Systems (NFS) can provide the shear connectors, anchor bars, welding tools, and any other studs or accessories you need to get the job done. When it comes to thru-deck stud welding operations, NFS offers the technical support and tools needed.

 

Composite construction applications like thru-deck welding requires careful consideration of each material used in the process and understanding of the process itself. When it comes to the composite building of structural beams, galvanized decking, and concrete, shear connectors welding studs are key for long-term structural integrity.

 

The included image shows a three-dimensional cross section of a weld-thru decking application. The shear connecter studs welded directly through the galvanized decking material fasten it to steel I-beams. A rebar webbing is overlaid for support and flexibility of the final layer of concrete finishing the composite system. As a complete decking system, this composite structure can be utilized in a range of applications, but is primarily used in the construction of multilevel buildings with steel beam skeletons.

 

The use of shear connector welding studs is critical in this type of composite construction system. If you are working with thru-deck weld construction processes, NFS can provide comprehensive shear connectors in varying dimensions, including stud diameter and length.

 

For general-purpose thru-deck composite welding, our shear connector studs have a minimum tensile strength of 61,000 psi (420 MPa) and a minimum yield strength of 49,000 psi (340 MPa). For shear connectors that will be used in composite beam construction like the processes used in multilevel buildings, our specialized studs have a minimum tensile strength of 65,000 psi (450 MPa) and a minimum yield strength of 51,000 psi (350 MPa). NFS also offers custom lengths for both types of shear connectors with any of our available diameter.

 

Not only do the connector studs fasten galvanized decking to structural beams, they are also key in shear load bearing. The minimum tensile and yield strength of each stud works together to support entire buildings upward of 100 stories. The system of a composite beam construction increases the flex range and support strength of the building as a whole, which allows it to react to movements of the earth plates, the wind, and other natural elements; weight inside the building; and changes in molecular size with temperature shifts. In every composite structure, shear connectors are key components.

 

To learn more about weld-thru decking and the use of stud welding in composite construction, contact NFS at (651) 730-7770 today, or request a quote online to get started with us today.

 

 

What Do Nelson® Studs, Jet Skis, and Chapstick Have in Common?

 

Nelson® Studs manufactures and supplies headed anchor and shear connector studs. What could they possibly have in common with jet skis and chapstick?

 

Consider this: when one of our customers calls us and needs headed anchors or shear connectors, they often simply ask for Nelson® studs. It seems that Nelson® studs have become synonymous with those studs in the industry.

 

This process where a brand name becomes synonymous with the product isn’t that uncommon. It’s called a “generic trademark” and you might be surprised by the wide range of products that are actually brand names, including jet skis and chapstick. (Or, rather, Jet Skis and Chapstick.)

 

While it could sound like a great thing for your product to be so widely known, some companies resist this process. For example, Google very actively attempts to prevent the use of the word “to google” to mean “search on the internet.” They do so to maintain ownership of the Google trademark.

 

Other generic trademark examples include Kleenex, Band-Aid, Popsicle, Q-Tips—even Seeing Eye Dog! That’s how we get from Nelson® Studs to Jet Skis and Chapstick. Because of their long history in the industry, Nelson® Studs have become synonymous with headed anchor and shear connector studs.

 

But just like there are multiple manufacturers of “personal watercraft” (i.e., Jet Skis) and many makers of “lip balm” (i.e., Chapstick), there are many quality manufacturers and brands of headed anchor and shear connector studs.

 

Northland Fastening Systems offers a wide stock of headed anchors, shear connectors, and many other studs for projects big and small. Our studs get the job done right, just like Nelson® studs. Custom lengths are available, and customers can take advantage of additional services like professional repairs, equipment rentals, and expert advice for the application of stud welding in your project.

 

So when you need headed anchors or shear connectors, don’t leap to the global brand first. Get in touch with Northland Fastening Systems!

To learn more about all our welding studs and services, contact Northland Fastening Systems at (651) 730-7770, or get started with us today and request a quote online.

 

 

Uses and Benefits of Automated Stud Welding Equipment

Stud welding is a relatively new manufacturing operation in comparison with other welding formats that have been used as far back as the Bronze Age. Since its beginnings in the Industrial Revolution and its rise in popularity for shipbuilding in WWII, stud welding has rapidly advanced technologically. Today, stud welding is used for a broad range of manufacturing applications, from large-scale structural construction to complex, food-grade equipment. Because of its widespread use, there are many applications where stud welding operations can be automated for results that are higher quality, more precise, and faster. With the help of Northland Fastening Systems expert technicians, you can integrate automation into your operations with our selection of state-of-the-art automated welding equipment and comprehensive welding studs.

 

Automation in the stud welding industry is one of the most recent developments that facilities can apply on their operations floor or in the field. Various formats of automated stud welding were developed to improve production in many ways with the benefits it provides.

 

Benefits

Automated stud welding provides many benefits to fabricators. Broadly speaking, this includes:

  • Efficiency
  • Speed
  • Accuracy
  • Cost Reduction

If your volume of production has recently increased, integrating automation into your facilities is an investment that will pay itself off quickly as it saves your welders the time, energy, and cost of keeping up with your production demands. Manufacturers using stud welding for a range of applications can almost always benefit from the implementation of automated welding equipment.

 

How It Works

Automation can be used in a factory setting or as a portable device with both automatic hand-held welding guns and CNC welding heads. The stud is inserted into the gun manually or with an automatic feeder, and the welding surface is processed on an automatic production line. For large-scale rapid welding, robotic welding systems are the most effective with computer-controlled precision and a fully automated production line.

Systems like our MPW 10102010 are highly effective when it comes to speeding up the production process and increasing volume. This system can perform up to 40 welds per minute using short cycle drawn arc welding with up to three welding heads operating simultaneously. It can also perform simple milling tasks for finishing assemblies or machining components.

For a more portable automated application, our handheld PAH-1 welding gun is a highly effective stud welding tool. Using CD, short cycle drawn arc, contact, or gap welding, this gun is a lightweight automation option for welding a variety of materials. This gun is especially effective in welding sheeting as thin as 0.5 mm.

 

Explore our comprehensive collection of automation products and other stud welding equipment options, or shop from our wide range of welding studs online. To learn more about automation in the welding industry or to get started with NFS for all your welding equipment and studs today, contact us at (651) 730-7770 or request a quote online.

Installing Insulation Sheeting Using Welding Studs

The use of various forms of insulation is extremely prevalent across industries. Not only is insulation used to control temperatures inside buildings and protect pipes from freezing in cold winter months, it’s also used extensively in many other applications. This includes everything from thermal power stations to electrical systems, mechanical systems, climate-controlled warehousing, fireproofing, automobiles, planes, spacecraft, protection against corrosion, and more.

 

Because the most effective installation method for the majority of insulations is stud welding, insulation and construction are key industries Northland Fastening System serves. We provide all the welding studs, welding units, stud welding guns, and accessories you need to complete your project.

 

Using CD stud welding processes to install insulation is the most effective method of attachment. The process of stud welding creates a connection point with no reverse side marking and stronger than the stud and base material itself. It also streamlines and speeds up the installation process, providing a rapid, short cycle install of insulation or fireproof sheeting.

 

How it works: Insulation sheeting can be installed with CD stud welding using pins that can be inserted through the insulating material and welded to the base material in a short cycle process. The tip of the pin is welded to the base material while cupped or flat heads hold down the insulation material. This welding process is a one-step system that allows quick and effective insulation sheeting attachment to base metal materials.

 

Applications: CD welding installation of insulation sheeting can be applied in any situation where the base material is a weldable metal such as steel, aluminum, or brass. This includes insulation for HVAC ducts, pipes, buildings, incinerators, equipment exposed to fire, plane cabins, spacecrafts, water towers, warehouses, and much more. Steel structures can be insulated against corrosion and temperatures up to 1,250º C (2,282º F) using stud welding in the installation process.

 

Benefits: In all applications of stud welding, there are many operational benefits. The process improves efficiency and cuts costs because it can be performed quickly with low energy use. Studs also create clean, strong bonds with conservative use of materials and long-term effectiveness. Installing insulation with stud welding streamlines the process, forms a lasting bond, and is visually clean and professional.

 

Get Welding Studs and Other Equipment for Your Next Project

If you need to install insulation or fire-resistant sheeting, stud welding is the way to go. To learn more about applications of stud welding or to get started on your project with the best welding studs, tools, and accessories, contact Northland Fastening Systems today at (651) 730-7770 or request a quote online.

General Applications of Drawn Arc and CD Stud Welding

Stud welding is one of the most versatile manufacturing operations for small to large scale construction. Though it was originally developed for use in shipbuilding of various types of vessels, it has grown in application to be used in many manufacturing industries worldwide. Its use in so many industries has helped to streamline and speed up the production process while improving the quality and long-term reliability of components and full assemblies.

 

If you are using stud welding in your fabrication processes, Northland Fastening Systems is your one-stop-shop for all the tools, studs, and accessories you need to get the job done. Our team of experts can guide you through the process of selecting the right specifications of studs, welding units, and any other items needed.

 

Because stud welding is such a versatile operation providing a connection point between two metals that is stronger than the metals themselves, it is used in an increasingly wide range of applications. Broadly speaking, these applications include the following:

 

  • Structural Construction: This includes buildings, bridges, water towers, elevators, mining structures, tunnels, overpasses, facades, highways, window frames, doors, and much more.
  • Automotive Construction: Stud welding is used extensively in the construction of all types of vehicles including passenger cars, trucks, SUVs, recreational vehicles, transport vehicles, fork trucks, military vehicles, motorcycles, aircraft, farm machinery, trains, cable cars, excavation vehicles, and much more.
  • Shipbuilding: Many components of ships of all types are fabricated using stud welding. This includes flooring, ceilings, walkways, kitchens, exterior hulling, lifeboats, insulation, food prep stations, and more.
  • Sheet Metal Construction: Various cabinets, enclosures, and other sheet metal products are made using stud welding for clean connection points with no reverse side marking. This includes electrical enclosures, signs, deposit boxes, mail containers, hinges, hand tools, grills, office products, and more.
  • Appliance Construction: Domestic and commercial appliances are also made using stud welding operations. This includes ovens, stoves, refrigerators, ranges, dishwashers, dryers, stereos, financial processors, vending machines, freezers, ice machines, cookware, and much more.
  • Climate Control System Construction: Components of quality HVAC and other climate control systems are also fabricated using stud welding including ducts, vents, dehumidifiers, fans, insulation, and more.
  • Sound-Proofing Construction: The construction of soundproof rooms and systems with stud welding are key to a wide range of applications. This includes recording booths, equipment testing rooms, ducting, building facades, roads, and more.
  • Power Generator Construction: Any type of energy generator needs a specialized system to isolate and transmit that power. Stud welding is key in the fabrication of transformers, reactors, boilers, nuclear systems, steam generators, coal systems, refractories, incinerators, and more.

 

Stud welding is also useful in the installation of insulation against heat, cold, fire, weather, and other harsh elements for a wide range of structures and objects.

 

To learn more about the applications of stud welding, contact Northland Fastening Systems at (651) 730-7770 today. To get started on your next project, request a quote online or give us a call.

Troubleshooting Connection Points for CD Stud Welding

While CD stud welding is a fairly simple process to the outside observer, the science, physics, and engineering behind it are complex. Very specific temperatures and times must be applied to the stud and weld surface for a connection point to be successful. When performed correctly, in fact, a CD stud weld connection point will be stronger than the stud itself. To help you get the job done quickly and efficiently with quality results, Northland Fastening Systems (NFS) provides comprehensive stud welding supplies and services, including welding studs of varying dimensions and thread sizing, stud welding tools for rent and purchase, and a variety of welding accessories for CD stud welding.

 

NFS technical service and stud welding tool manufacturers provide rich information about the calibration of stud weld equipment and the pairing of welding materials. However, if you are having difficulties calibrating your equipment and are seeing poor results, there are basic troubleshooting procedures you can easily perform.

 

For example, troubleshooting a poor weld connection starts with testing for weld failure.

 

Weld Failure

A successful stud weld connection point is stronger than the stud itself. Because of this, placing stress on both the stud and connection point at the same time to the point of failure can tell you the condition and accuracy of the weld. Ideally, the stud will fail before the weld point because it should be weaker (as seen at 2:18 in our demonstration of the HBS Visar 650). If the weld connection fails at all, the weld connection was unsuccessful. This failure could occur for several reasons, including:

 

  • Cold Weld: CD stud welding procedures have to meet a specific temperature and that temperature has to be applied for a specific period of time. The temperatures and times vary depending on the size and material of the stud as well as the weld surface material. It becomes very clear, however, that a weld was too cold (too low of a temperature, too short of a weld time, or both) if it fails in a stress test. Visually, you can also see if a weld was too cold if the melted area around the stud isn’t an acceptable 360º deep radius.

 

  • Hot Weld: A weld connection point can also fail because of a hot weld if the time or temperature are applied in excess (or if excess heat is applied very quickly). The most obvious sign of a hot weld is a burn-through, which manifests as any distortion to the reverse side of the base material. Even the slightest distortion can compromise the quality of a weld. Another sign of less dramatic hot welds is the splash size of the stud around its base at the weld point. A wide or messy splash of cooled molten metal are a common sign of a hot weld that will fail under stress.

 

To learn more about the potential failures and troubleshooting CD stud welding, contact NFS at (651) 730-7770 or request a quote online today.

Benefits of ISO 9001:2015 Certification for Providers of Stud Welding Supplies and Services

Northland Fastening Systems is a provider of high-quality stud welding tools, supplies, and accessories for a comprehensive range of stud welding applications. We offer studs in all dimensions, and we can provide custom studs on request. Our welding units are available for rent or purchase, and our welding accessories meet a wide variety of needs for projects big and small.

 

We also have a team of skilled, knowledgeable stud welding technicians well equipped to perform complete stud welding services both in the field and in-house. With the help of our expert technicians and our comprehensive equipment and facilities, we can help you finish a stud welding job with efficiency, quality, and long-term effectiveness.

 

Our quality management system for our stud welding services and facilities are ISO 9001:2015 certified. When a facility and operational process has an ISO (International Organization for Standardization) certification, it means the system has met these worldwide standards for the consistency of quality work, the continued adherence to ISO standards, the assessment of worker safety and environmental impact, and the continued improvement of practices.

 

When you partner with NFS for stud welding supplies and services, you gain the advantage of our ISO certification and all the benefits it provides, including:

 

  • Improved Quality: Meeting the standards an ISO certification requires means we have to strive continuously to provide the highest quality possible. This applies to our stud welding services, welding units, welding studs used, project management practices, safety gear, and more. Our own improved quality affects the quality of all our customers’ work in turn.
  • Improved Efficiency: As a result of improved quality at all stages, our stud welding technicians are able to improve the efficiency of your production as a whole. This means we can reduce waste, improve environmental impacts, streamline the welding and assembly process, and speed up your work. Our improved efficiency also improves efficiency for the customer down the line.
  • Improved Safety: To maintain our certification, we’re continually searching for ways to improve our safety practices in the workplace and in the products we sell and use. The protection of our workers, the improvement of our maintenance programs, and the development of project scheduling and record keeping all work together to advance our safety practices. This means our relationship with the customer and the services/products we provide all see improvements.
  • Continual Improvement: With our quality, efficiency, and safety practices all seeing improvements with continued adherence to ISO certification standards, our services and products improve together over time. NFS is committed to finding ways to continually improve every aspect of our stud welding services in addition to meeting each advancement in ISO certification requirements.

 

To learn more about our ISO certification and the benefits it offers, contact Northland Fastening Systems at (651) 730-7770 or request a quote online to get started on your stud welding today.

Specifics of Sanitary Food Grade Welding

Welding of all kinds plays a large role in commercial-grade food equipment. From the shelving units used to store fresh, frozen, and dry foods to stoves and ovens used daily, welding operations are used in the manufacturing process. Stud welding, in particular, is a commonly used manufacturing technique for many types of equipment used in restaurants, hospitals, hotels, and other commercial kitchens as well as in food production and packaging industries. Even some equipment in home kitchens is made with certain components of stud welding. Northland Fastening Systems provides everything you might need for all applications of food grade welding, from studs of all dimensions to tools for rent and purchase in addition to the expert services of our own technicians.

 

Equipment used in the food industry must meet U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) standards for sanitation, including the very specific requirements of the FDA’s Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). This means, every step of the fabrication process must guarantee that end results meet those standards. When it comes to stud welding, regulations are in place for food grade welding processes.

 

The foundational requirements of food grade welding include:

 

  1. Precise Finish: A smooth finish with the elimination of burrs and sharp particles of metal of all kinds must be accomplished. Even microscopic burrs or sharps can compromise a food grade piece of equipment. Rough surfaces should also be smoothed and finished in a way that removes any spaces for food particles to get caught and build bacteria colonies.
  2. Sealed and Bolted: The full framework of a piece of equipment should be sealed at connection points. Simply bolted connection points can have opportunities for increased vulnerability to corrosion or storage of bacteria. Components that can be detached for cleaning must also be built in a way that reattaches with a full seal.
  3. Correct Design: The equipment should be designed in a way that only uses internal angles or corners. External angles create spaces in which bacteria can thrive, which compromises any food grade equipment.
  4. Surface Working: Surfaces should be worked in a way that doesn’t overstress the materials. Overworking can leave any layers protecting against oxidation susceptible to being quickly stripped away.
  5. Compatible Weld: The stud and the surface material must be compatible. Any incompatible welds are more vulnerable to corroding and contamination food or cracking under thermal stress.

 

If you are fabricating food grade equipment of any kind, it’s critical to consider these requirements and any other standards outlined in the FSMA before beginning your project. To learn more about food grade welding, and stud welding overall, contact Northland Fastening Systems today at (651) 730-7770 or request a quote online to get started on your stud welding project.